ISSN 2043-8087
Journal of Experimental Psychopathology
 Volume 3, Issue 4, 612-623, 2012
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Safety Behaviours, Rumination and Trait Paranoia in a Non-Clinical Sample

Authors
Jennifer Simpson (a), Bryony MacGregor (a), Kate Cavanagh (b) and Robert E.J Dudley (a)(b)
(a) Doctorate in Clinical Psychology, Newcastle University
(b) Institute of Neuroscience, Newcastle University

Volume 3, Issue 4, 2012, Pages 612-623
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5127/jep.027212

Abstract
Cognitive behavioural models of persecutory delusions hypothesise that paranoid threat beliefs are maintained by cognitive and behavioural processes which promote confirmatory information and reduce disconfirmatory information. Such mechanisms include engagement with safety behaviours and iterative, self-focused cognitive processes such as worry and rumination. This paper reports a study investigating the relationship between safety behaviours, rumination and paranoia in a non-clinical sample (N = 133). A single group cross-sectional design was utilised. Strong correlations between these factors were identified, and were not accounted for by negative affect. Hierarchical multiple regression revealed that engagement in safety behaviours and rumination explained 49% of the variance of paranoia when combined with age, gender and negative affect. This paper provides some evidence for the role of safety behaviours and rumination in the presence of paranoid threat beliefs. Further research is needed to explore the causal relationship between these variables, and their explanatory power within a clinical sample. If replicated, these findings suggest that mental health practitioners would be wise to consider these variables in the assessment, formulation and treatment of paranoia.

Table of Contents
Introduction
  Safety Behaviours
  Rumination
  The Current Study
    Hypothesis 1.
    Hypothesis 2.
Methods
  Design
  Participants
  Measures
  Procedure
  Data Analysis
Results
  Data Screening
  Data Analysis
    Descriptive statistics.
    Correlational analysis.
    Hierarchical regression.
Discussion
  Study Limitations
References

Correspondence to
Jennifer Simpson, Foxrush House, Green Square, Kirkleatham Business Park, Redcar, TS10 5RS.

Keywords
paranoia, rumination, safety behaviours, threat beliefs, persecutory delusions

Dates
Received 16 Feb 2012; Revised 2 Aug 2012; Accepted 21 Aug 2012; In Press 23 Sep 2012







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