ISSN 2043-8087
Journal of Experimental Psychopathology
 Volume 6, Issue 1, 112-125, 2015
Abstract  E-mail Abstract   Article Download as PDF 
Return to Issue List 
Free Article Active Approach Does not Add to the Effects of in Vivo Exposure

Authors
  Sophie van Uijen - Department of Clinical and Health Psychology, Utrecht University, Utrecht, the Netherlands.
  Marcel van den Hout - Department of Clinical and Health Psychology, Utrecht University, Utrecht, the Netherlands.
  Iris Engelhard - Department of Clinical and Health Psychology, Utrecht University, Utrecht, the Netherlands.

Volume 6, Issue 1, 2015, Pages 112-125
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5127/jep.042014

Abstract
In exposure therapy, anxiety patients actively approach feared stimuli to violate their expectations of danger and reduce fear. Prior research has shown that stimulus evaluation and behavior are reciprocally related. This suggests that approach behavior itself may decrease fear. This study tested whether approach behavior adds to the beneficial effects of exposure. Spider fearful women were randomly assigned to one of three groups: repeated exposure to a spider by pulling a cart with a jar containing the spider toward them (Exposure + approach) or by having the experimenter do this (Exposure only), or no exposure. Exposure decreased self-reported and behavioral spider fear, compared to no exposure. The decrease was similar for exposure with and without the approach manipulation. No effects were found on affective priming. Our results did not show an added effect of approach by pulling a feared stimulus toward you to exposure. However, the mere visual impression of approach, and/or the decision to approach may have reduced fear.

Table of Contents
Introduction
Method
 Participants
 Measures
  Spider Anxiety Screening (“Spinnenangst screening”; SAS).
  Fear of spiders questionnaire (FSQ).
  Disgust scale revised (DS-R).
  Behavioral approach test (BAT).
  Affective priming task (APT).
  Word and picture evaluation task.
  Perceived control.
 Procedure
 Data Analysis
Results
 Participant Characteristics and Baseline Differences
  Outcome Measures
  FSQ.
  BAT.
  APT.
  Pleasantness.
  Exposure Trials: Time Course of Effects and Perceived Control
Discussion
Acknowledgements
References

Correspondence to
Sophie L. van Uijen, Heidelberglaan 1, 3584 CS Utrecht, the Netherlands.

Keywords
Approach behavior, Spider phobia, Fear, Exposure and response prevention (ERP), Cognitive behavior therapy (CBT)

Dates
Received 18 Mar 2014; Revised 30 Jul 2014; Accepted 4 Aug 2014; In Press 5 Apr 2015









© Copyright 2009-2016 Textrum Ltd . All rights reserved. Published in the UK. - Contact Us Advertise | Privacy Policy | Terms of Use