ISSN 2043-8087
Journal of Experimental Psychopathology
 Volume 7, Issue 1, 41-48, 2016
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Peculiar/Unusual Perceptions and Beliefs and Covariation Detection

Authors
  Howard Berenbaum - Department of Psychology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Champaign, Illinois, USA

Volume 7, Issue 1, 2016, Pages 41-48
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5127/jep.039813

Abstract
The present research explored the possibility that peculiar/unusual perceptions and/or beliefs might be associated with covariation detection. One-hundred thirty-five college students completed the Perceptual Aberration and Magical Ideation scales. They also performed a task in which they were presented with unpleasant images and asked to indicate whether the image was upright or rotated; participants were told the task was examining the impact of distraction on visual processing. In fact, loud noises were paired disproportionately with images of automobile accidents. After completing the task, participants were asked to identify the type of image that had been paired disproportionately with the loud noises. Participants who successfully detected the covariation had significantly higher Perceptual Aberration scale scores than did participants who did not detect the covariation.

Table of Contents
Introduction
Methods
 Participants
 Procedure
 Covariation Detection
 Peculiar/Unusual Perceptions and Beliefs
 Neuroticism
Mood
Results
Discussion
Acknowledgements
References

Correspondence to
Howard Berenbaum, Department of Psychology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 603 E. Daniel St., Champaign IL 61820, USA.

Keywords
perceptual aberration, magical ideation, schizotypy, covariation detection, incidental learning

Dates
Received 29 Oct 2013; Revised 30 Apr 2015; Accepted 4 Jun 2015; In Press 19 Mar 2016







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