ISSN 2043-8087
Journal of Experimental Psychopathology
 Volume 7, Issue 4, 608-618, 2016
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Metacognitive Therapy Applications in Social Phobia: An Exploratory Study of the Individual and Combined Effects of the Attention Training Technique and Situational Attentional Refocusing

Authors
  Patrick A. Vogel - Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Department of Psychology, Trondheim, Norway.
  Roger Hagen - Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Department of Psychology, Trondheim, Norway.
  Odin Hjemdal - Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Department of Psychology, Trondheim, Norway.
  Stian Solem - Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Department of Psychology, Trondheim, Norway.
  Maud C. B. Smeby - Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Department of Psychology, Trondheim, Norway.
  Eivind R. Strand - Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Department of Psychology, Trondheim, Norway.
  Peter Fisher - University of Liverpool, Division of Clinical Psychology, Whelan Building, Liverpool, United Kingdom.
  Hans M. Nordahl - University of Liverpool, Division of Clinical Psychology, Whelan Building, Liverpool, United Kingdom.
  Adrian Wells - University of Manchester, School of Psychological Sciences, Rawnsley Building, Manchester Royal Infirmary, Manchester, United Kingdom

Volume 7, Issue 4, 2016, Pages 608-618
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5127/jep.054716

Abstract

Individuals with social phobia have difficulty disengaging from self-processing in social situations. Metacognitive therapy interventions for enhancing attentional control were administered to a convenience sample of 24 with a social phobia diagnosis. Using  a cross-over design, 11 participants were given  4 weekly sessions of Attention Training Technique (ATT), followed by 4 weekly sessions of Situational Attentional Refocusing (SAR).  For the other thirteen participants the two treatment components were given in the reverse order. All participants made significant reductions on interview rated and self-reported measures of social and general levels of  anxiety by the end of the first intervention (either ATT or SAR).  Following completion of the second treatment components, further reductions  were observed and 46% (n=11) of the total sample no longer met DSM-IV criteria for social phobia. A significant order effect on the ADIS-IV interview measure was found favoring patients receiving SAR interventions first. Overall these  brief techniques aimed at increasing attentional flexibility were associated with large and clinically significant changes in social phobia symptoms.


Table of Contents
Introduction
Method
 Design
 Participants
 Measures
 Treatment
 Statistical analyses
Results
 Preliminary analyses
 Both ATT and SAR interventions combined
 Independent and Order Effects of ATT and SAR
Discussion
Acknowledgements
References

Correspondence to
Patrick A. Vogel, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Department of Psychology, Dragvoll, 7491 Trondheim, Norway.

Keywords
social phobia, attention training technique, attentional control, metacognitive therapy, situational attentional refocusing

Dates
Received 26 Jan 2016; Revised 5 May 2016; Accepted 5 May 2016; In Press 16 May 2016







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