ISSN 2043-8087
Journal of Experimental Psychopathology
 Volume 7, Issue 3, 484-498, 2016
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Attention and Interpretation Biases and Attention Control in Youth with Social Anxiety Disorder

Authors
  Lee Pergamin-Hight - School of Psychological Sciences, Tel-Aviv Univers
  Shani Bitton - School of Psychological Sciences, Tel-Aviv Univers
  Daniel S. Pine - Emotion and Development Branch, Intramural Researc
  Nathan A. Fox - Department of Human Development and Quantitative M
  Yair Bar-Haim - School of Psychological Sciences, Sagol School of

Volume 7, Issue 3, 2016, Pages 484-498
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5127/jep.053115

Abstract
Social anxiety disorder (SAD) is associated with threat-related attention and interpretation biases.  Recent research suggests that attention control abilities moderate these associations.  The current study examines threat-related attentional engagement and disengagement biases, negative interpretation bias, and attention control among youth with SAD (n=71) and non-anxious youth (n=42).  We further explore interactions between cognitive biases, and between these biases and attention control, in predicting SAD.  Relative to non-anxious, youth with SAD had poorer attention control, t(111)=6.32, p<.001, greater difficulty disengaging from angry faces, t(107)=1.98, p=.05, and a negative biased interpretation of ambiguous social scenarios, t(111)=-2.38,p =.01.  Unlike previous reports, no interactions were found among these factors in relation to SAD diagnosis or symptoms.  The present results add to research on cognitive biases in anxious children, emphasizing a distinct contribution of each of these cognitive mechanisms, rather than their interactional influences.  Findings are discussed in relation to cognitive developmental models of anxiety.

Table of Contents
Introduction
Method
 Participants
 Questionnaires
 Threat-Related Attention Bias - Emotion Spatial-Cuing Task
 Interpretation Bias
 General Procedure
 Data Analysis
Results
 Groups Characteristics
 Primary Analysis - Clinician Reported Diagnostic Status
 Secondary Analysis - Youth Self-Reported Symptom Severity
Discussion
Acknowledgements
References

Correspondence to
Lee Pergamin-Hight, School of Psychological Sciences, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv, 69978, Isreal

Keywords
social anxiety; attention bias; interpretation bias; attention control; pediatric anxiety

Dates
Received 28 Nov 2015; Revised 30 Jun 2016; Accepted 30 Jun 2016; In Press 3 Jul 2016









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