ISSN 2043-8087
Journal of Experimental Psychopathology
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The predictors of anticipatory processing before a social-evaluative situation

Authors
  Stephanos Vassilopoulos - Uni of Patras
  Andreas Brouzos - Uni of Ioannina

In Press (Uncorrected Proof), Pages 1-20
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5127/jep.061116

Abstract

Anticipatory processing is a repetitive thinking process that precedes social-evaluative events. The aim of this study was to examine factors that may predict the extent to which individuals engage in anticipatory processing. Perfectionistic beliefs, social interaction anxiety, anxiety sensitivity, anticipatory processing, and positive beliefs about anticipatory processing were assessed in a large college student sample (N = 225). Anticipatory processing was greater prior to performance situations relative to social interaction situations. In addition, social interaction anxiety, positive beliefs about anticipatory processing and anxiety sensitivity, but not perfectionistic beliefs, significantly predicted the extent to which the participants engaged in anticipatory processing related to an anxiety-provoking event. Finally, factors that appear to impact on the anticipatory processing varied according to the nature of social situation.


Table of Contents

Correspondence to
Dr Stephanos Vassilopoulos

Keywords
anticipatory processing, CBT, social anxiety, Clark & Wells model

Dates
Received 24 Dec 2016; Revised 2 Aug 2017; Accepted 2 Aug 2017; In Press 26 Nov 2017







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