ISSN 2043-8087
Journal of Experimental Psychopathology
 Volume 3, Issue 4, 650-660, 2012
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Effect of High or Low Imagery on Auditory Hallucinatory Content in Individuals Scoring High in Schizotypy

Authors
Jordan Randell, Megha Goyal, Jo Saunders, and Phil Reed
Swansea University, UK

Volume 3, Issue 4, 2012, Pages 650-660
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5127/jep.021711

Abstract
The present study examined the occurrence, and content, of auditory hallucinatory experiences in non-clinical participants scoring high or low in schizotypy. Participants listened to 10 one-minute recordings of white noise, some of which contained embedded high or low imagery words, and were asked to record any words that they heard. Results showed that high scorers on the unusual experiences scale of the Oxford-Liverpool Inventory of Feelings and Experiences showed a bias toward making hallucinatory reports of a low imagery type than of a high imagery type, but there were no significant differences for low UE scorers. Low scorers in impulsive nonconformity made more low imagery hallucinatory reports than high imagery reports. The results suggest a bias toward more hallucinatory reports of low imagery words.

Table of Contents
Introduction
Method
  Participants
  Measures
    Schizotypy.
    Depression.
    Anxiety.
  Experimental Task
  Procedure
Results
Discussion
References

Correspondence to
Phil Reed, Department of Psychology, Swansea University, Singleton Park, Swansea, SA2 8PP, U.K.

Keywords
false perceptions; hallucinations; hallucinatory content; individual differences in cognitive/perceptual biases; positive schizotypy; positive symptoms of schizophrenia

Dates
Received 19 Jul 2010; Revised 5 Dec 2011; Accepted 8 Feb 2012; In Press 23 Sep 2012







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